Sick Of Me

Sick Of Me

Our world is filled with fake facades, from filters on social media to “holier than thou” personas that can be seen in hypocritical believers. To combat the fake trends, a new trend has emerged; transparency and vulnerability. Instead of being filtered or super-spiritual, we’re told to be real and honest. And rightly so. We should be able to get real with each other about our junk. But should we stop there? Should we gather to simply chat about our current version of “me”? Is community about more than just being understood by one another in our hard places? Does God actually have change in store for us beyond our broken places? In Sick of Me, Whitney shows us that spiritual growth means being both honest and holy—that we can come to Jesus just as we are, but we cannot stay that way. We should fight for more. We should fight for true transformation, not quick fixes.

Sick of Me is one of the most convicting books I have read this year. I pride myself in being honest about my life, especially with dishonesty in my background. As Whitney points out transparency is selfish without transformation. I can share my life with you, especially my imperfections and sin, but if I’m not pursuing sanctification and believing that where I am today is not where I have to stay, its pride boosting at best. It’s not glorifying to God or helpful or encouraging to anyone needing a reminder that God does work and transform us. This was a hard read in that it did convict me, but in no way did I feel put down reading Whitney’s words; I was encouraged and directed to God every page of the way. I highly recommend Sick of Me if you are sick of yourself doing your best to be honest and transparent, but nothing is changing. This would make a great book to do with a small group/bible study.

I received Sick of Me for free from B&H Publishing in exchange for my honest review.